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Leo

Leo

Click on the image above to view the slide show. Caution! This one is graphic.

Photos courtesy of the California Turtle & Tortoise Club (CTTC): Valley Chapter
Text by Karen Berry: Treasurer | Adoption Chair

Leo is a leopard tortoise from the West Valley Shelter. Normally, he would be adopted out by the shelter, but he had been attacked by a dog, and was severely injured. He also had not been raised properly, and his shell was extremely pyramided from a poor diet. The back of his shell from the right rear leg around to the left rear leg was chewed off, there was an angry open wound above his tail, and damage to the plastron, or bottom shell. The shelter is not equipped to provide the treatment, potential surgery, and the extensive rehabilitation he would need. He was released to us for medical treatment and rehabilitation, and to eventually find a good home for him.

We took him to our vet, where he was examined, and a treatment plan prescribed, pending surgery to close the open wound above his tail. He was going to need a lot of daily treatment with betadine soaks, antibiotic injections, and treating the open wound with antibiotic cream. As this was very intensive, and we had a number of patients already in treatment, our friends at American Tortoise Rescue, who have extensive experience in treating this type of injury, agreed to treat and rehabilitate him. Despite the severity of his wounds, he had a good appetite, and has responded well to the treatment. And as often happens when we care for severely injured tortoises, because of the one-on-one time spent with them, Susan fell in love with him. He has his "forever home," and because of how well he is healing, it looks like he won’t have to have the surgery on his tail. The wound is not going to heal perfectly, but he is loved and doesn't have to look "pretty," according to his new "Mom." As it gets better, and the area is less tender, the sharp edges where the shell was chewed will be smoothed, and his skin will scab over. He walks around without issue, has a great appetite, and is doing really well.

Leo

Leo

Leo

Click on the image above to view the slide show. Caution! This one is graphic.

Photos courtesy of the California Turtle & Tortoise Club (CTTC): Valley Chapter
Text by Karen Berry: Treasurer | Adoption Chair

Photos courtesy of the California Turtle & Tortoise Club (CTTC): Valley Chapter Text by Karen Berry: Treasurer | Adoption Chair

Leo is a leopard tortoise from the West Valley Shelter. Normally, he would be adopted out by the shelter, but he had been attacked by a dog, and was severely injured. He also had not been raised properly, and his shell was extremely pyramided from a poor diet. The back of his shell from the right rear leg around to the left rear leg was chewed off, there was an angry open wound above his tail, and damage to the plastron, or bottom shell. The shelter is not equipped to provide the treatment, potential surgery, and the extensive rehabilitation he would need. He was released to us for medical treatment and rehabilitation, and to eventually find a good home for him.

We took him to our vet, where he was examined, and a treatment plan prescribed, pending surgery to close the open wound above his tail. He was going to need a lot of daily treatment with betadine soaks, antibiotic injections, and treating the open wound with antibiotic cream. As this was very intensive, and we had a number of patients already in treatment, our friends at American Tortoise Rescue, who have extensive experience in treating this type of injury, agreed to treat and rehabilitate him. Despite the severity of his wounds, he had a good appetite, and has responded well to the treatment. And as often happens when we care for severely injured tortoises, because of the one-on-one time spent with them, Susan fell in love with him. He has his "forever home," and because of how well he is healing, it looks like he won’t have to have the surgery on his tail. The wound is not going to heal perfectly, but he is loved and doesn't have to look "pretty," according to his new "Mom." As it gets better, and the area is less tender, the sharp edges where the shell was chewed will be smoothed, and his skin will scab over. He walks around without issue, has a great appetite, and is doing really well.

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